Gina Rodriguez Fan

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elcome to Gina Rodriguez Fan, your online resource dedicated to American actress Gina Rodriguez. You may know Gina from her roles in "Jane the Virgin", "Annihilation", "Deepwater Horizon", "Filly Brown" and many more television and film roles. This fansite is home to the most comprehensive photo gallery on Gina Rodriguez with over 73,000 photos. It is our aim to be a hub online for Gina fans to visit for the latest news, photos, and information in supporting Gina's career, while still respecting her privacy. We hope you enjoy your stay and don't forget to bookmark us and follow us on twitter to see news and photos on your twitter feed. - J.
Posted by Girl Jay on January 10, 2019

Gina is featured on the new February issue of Cosmopolitan magazine. Check out some of her interview below, view magazine scans, photo session images, and video from her interview.

You know that feeling at the top of the rollercoaster? When you’re seconds away from the first big plunge and feeling that perfect mix of excitement, anticipation, and fear? Gina Rodriguez feels like that pretty much all the time these days. Or as she puts it, grinning from ear to ear during lunch at a Culver City restaurant, ­“terrified as fuuuck.”

The 34-year-old actress has filmed 10 movies during her time off from the instant hit Jane the Virgin, but it’s the upcoming Miss Bala where she lays her reputation, future career, and big-screen viability on the line. She stars as Gloria, a Mexican-American who finds herself swept up—and complicit—in the deadly crimes of a cartel. Taking this professional leap, she says emphatically, makes her really scared. But she’s not preoccupied with achieving box-office success or critical acclaim.

“I felt very alone growing up. I didn’t feel represented. I didn’t feel a part of the conversation,” she explains. “And if you see yourself projected, you believe you are worthy, valuable.” Miss Bala as a whole is groundbreaking. The majority of the cast is Latinx, and so were many of its crew. “When Holly­wood reimagines films, they have historically whitewashed them. In this case, the American girl is me, a Latina born in this country. I find that revolutionary.”

Of course, Gina would like the movie to follow in the barrier-breaking footsteps of Black Panther and Crazy Rich Asians. But if it bombs? “Hopefully, it’s the same thing that happens every time a white movie bombs,” she says. “They just make another one!”

Gina arrived for our lunch wearing cropped Levi’s and a cozy cream sweater, her hair pulled into a messy bun. But the casual look and warm energy mask this workaholic’s ambition. “I was a broke, starving artist for years before I got Jane,” she says of her drive and jam-packed schedule.

Her intensity is obvious in our freewheeling convo, which skips from feminism (“It’s not ‘women are ­better.’ It’s equality”) to reproductive rights (“If abortion is ­illegal, ejaculation should be too!”) to whether she wants to freeze her eggs (she doesn’t).

In fact, Gina can trace her ambition back to when she set a goal for herself, at 14, to star on a TV show. She orders a mimosa as she recounts what it was like back then, when she lived in Chicago, one of three first-­generation daughters born to Puerto Rican parents. Her mom made killer arroz con pollo, and Nuyorican salsa music was always playing. “For years and years, I tried,” she says. “When I was 29, I hit it.”

That’s when she landed the role of Jane Villanueva, a virgin whose life takes on telenovela-level drama when she’s mistakenly inseminated with a sample from her smoking-hot, wealthy boss. It’s a part that scored Gina a Golden Globe and made her a household name.

“It’s interesting. As a performer, you have to quite literally bury your life,” she says. “At the same time, every day on-set I’m like, How the hell did I get this lucky? To live out your dreams is a really surreal experience.”

But not every day is peachy. While filming the fifth and final season of Jane, Gina’s beloved rescue pup Casper started walking funny and had to be rushed to the vet. She found out he needed emergency spinal surgery between takes. “And I couldn’t cry because I was doing a scene where Jane’s happy and things are great,” she says. The next day, she got an update.

“As I’m walking into my Cosmo cover shoot, thinking, Wow, I’m finally gonna be a Cosmo girl!, the doctor says, ‘Casper has no motor function in his legs.’” In the moment, all Gina could think about was how he was doing. But you’d never know it, looking at these photos. Because part of her job is to put a big-ass smile on her face, even when it’s the last thing she wants to do.

The struggles of being in the public eye have hit Gina hard. “The anxiety started coming, like, two years into Jane. I had my first panic attack at a sushi restaurant. All of a sudden, I thought I was going to die, and people are taking pictures. It was horrendous,” she says, shaking her head. “There are a lot of things in the manual of living out your dreams that you don’t know about. Like you don’t have any more friends. You never go out to eat. You never see your family, your boyfriend, girlfriend, or whatever you have….”

What Gina has is her fiancé, Joe LoCicero. They got engaged last ­summer and stans lap up their PDA on social media. (The ­couple met when Joe played a stripper during season two of Jane.)

“Dating Joe was a new experience for me because I put myself first,” she says. “For so long, I put every man in front of me. As a successful woman, it is so hard because of our cultural norms that, like, the man has to be the breadwinner! And the man has to be the more powerful one. It was so difficult for me to find a man who didn’t want me to dim my light for his ego.”

Their love lies in the little things too. Keeping the house clutter-free is one of the ways Gina curbs her anxiety. Even after a 14-plus-hour day on-set, she compulsively tidies up. Recently, she mentioned to Joe how relaxing her nights had felt, and he confessed that he’d been doing all the dirty work before she got home, to save her the stress. “He was like, ‘I just want you for 15 more minutes,’” she says, tearing up. “It made me cry. I was like, ‘Fuck, yeah. Get rid of the clutter! Thank you, baby.’” She grabs a napkin and dabs her eyes. “And he puts the seat down,” she says, “and sometimes I leave the seat up for him.”

When I ask how she knew Joe was her person, she compares him, ­surprisingly, to an autoimmune disorder she’s had since she was 19. “I said this to Joe the other day, and he was like, ‘That sounds terrible.’ But it’s true,” she says. “My Hashimoto’s, it’s just a part of me. That’s how I feel with Joe. There was this moment of, Oh, I’m going to be with you forever.”
Gina’s condition can cause fatigue, depression, and weight gain, something she finds frustrating. “I remember my first cover shoot. I heard them ­whispering, ‘When she stands like that, it doesn’t look good.’ Those comments feel like knives from across the room,” she says. “I can hear you! And who fucking cares if it doesn’t look attractive? This is the way I look when I sit. My shit folds!”

But her life—her stardom, romance, and self-worth—has changed.

“I finally love my body,” she says. “I let go of the anxiety and the fear of not looking beautiful. Because it’s not about the picture. It’s about the fact that I stand on this cover with every Latina who wished she saw herself reflected. Because it’s not my face—it’s the 55-million-plus girls who are like, ‘Holy shit! We belong.’”
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Posted by Girl Jay on January 08, 2019

Gina was in attendance at the 2019 Golden Globe Awards last night. She looked so beautiful. I’ve added hundreds of photos from the event so check them out in the gallery. I want to thank my amazing friends, Maria, Claudia, Victoria, Kayla, for their donations and help as I have been recovering from pain and haven’t been able to come on much. Enjoy!

Posted by Girl Jay on November 16, 2018

Welcome to the third annual Women in Television issue, which celebrates some of the industry’s most incredible women and asks them to debate the problems facing females working in TV. From fair pay to power imbalances and speaking up on set, they get vocal in this unmissable interview…

GINA RODRIGUEZ
Rodriguez, 34, rose to fame as the titular star of acclaimed comedy Jane the Virgin, which is currently in its final season. In 2015, she was the first actor on the CW Network to win a Golden Globe, and this year donated the money that was set aside for her Emmy campaign to pay for the college tuition of an undocumented Latina student. She set up I Can & I Will Productions to tackle the lack of Latinx representation on- and off-screen

My favorite TV show growing up was Martin. I love comedy and Martin Lawrence was revolutionary in that time because there weren’t many people of color on screen. He lived with his wife Gina in a small apartment… It just felt much more relatable than, say, Full House, which definitely wasn’t the way I was raised at all.

Growing up as a Latina in the United States, I didn’t see us portrayed positively on TV. When you see certain images repeated so often, the reflection of representation on screen makes you feel a certain way about yourself. You tell somebody over and over again that they’re something, eventually they’re gonna believe it. I just wonder how much more tolerant our society would be if there weren’t such stereotypical roles portrayed for so long. If Latinos weren’t always portrayed as the villain, would we really feel a particular way about that community? If Muslims weren’t portrayed as the terrorists, would we feel a certain way about that community? I don’t think so. Art does, I believe, create tolerance. It can be responsible for healing so much – when it’s a reflection of reality.

I grew up economically challenged. We did not have much, at all. When I would do small short films or things for barely any money and I could barely pay rent, my father would tell me: “Don’t worry about the money you’re making now. You prove to them how much you’re worth!” And I used to think, “Do I know how much I’m worth? Have I been taught how much I’m worth?” Now, when I get blessed to be the lead or get a big film, do I know my worth? And do I know how to ask for my worth? How do you get that when you’re not taught it?

When I get the chance to watch television, I love It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia – they’re really awful people and they remind you that there’s funny in the world of awful. I started watching Vida, which is very cool – I’m really proud of [screenwriter] Tanya Saracho for creating something new and revolutionary. And The Good Place brings me so much happiness and light-heartedness right now. But if I was going to award anything, I’d say Black Mirror. We should be using it as a guide to what we shouldn’t do in our culture.

I feel extremely listened to as a woman on set. Very empowered. Very respected. Jane the Virgin is female-led – 70% female writers, 70% female cast, 70% female directors – so it’s very common to see women in high-powered positions on our show. I know that’s not common, so I don’t take that for granted. At all.

The TV show of my life would be called I’m Just Trying.

Watch Season 5 of Jane the Virgin on Netflix now
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Posted by Girl Jay on November 06, 2018

Gina was in Florida this weekend along with America Ferrera, Eva Langoria, Zoe Salanda, and Rosario Dawson, for the Latina’s Stand Up Election events. I’ve added photos of her appearances as well as a photo session she did with the girls. I love how politically active Gina is. It makes me even more of a fan girl.

Posted by Girl Jay on May 29, 2018

Evan Rachel Wood, Gina Rodriguez and Other Stars Take Aim at TV’s Patriarchy: ‘There’s No Going Back’
TheWrap Emmy magazine: Zazie Beetz, Alison Brie, Rachel Brosnahan, Claire Foy, Gina Rodriguez, Yara Shahidi and Evan Rachel Wood talk about “laying the truth down”

Video Clips:

Video Clip #1

This story first appeared as the cover story in the Race Begins issue of TheWrap’s Emmy magazine.

It’s a different day for Hollywood, and for our culture. From the time allegations of sexual misbehavior rained down on mogul Harvey Weinstein last October, this business and many others have been rocked by revelations and allegations, and by a sense that the time is long overdue to afford women equal respect and equal opportunities rather than treating them like commodities.

In this climate — with hashtags like #MeToo and organizations like Time’s Up working to affect real change — TheWrap convened seven television actresses to discuss what they’ve experienced in their careers, what they’ve seen in the last nine months and where they’d like things to go from here.

TheWrap’s Sharon Waxman and Beatrice Verhoeven asked the questions; Zazie Beetz from “Atlanta,” Alison Brie from “GLOW,” Rachel Brosnahan from “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel,” Claire Foy from “The Crown,” Gina Rodriguez from “Jane the Virgin,” Yara Shahidi from “black-ish” and “grown-ish” and Evan Rachel Wood from “Westworld” answered them.

What does it feel like for all of you at this particular moment in time, with everything that has happened over the last eight or nine months? Are you mindful of the politics going on around you in Hollywood and in the wider world?
ALISON BRIE Well, there’s no way to ignore what’s going on in our industry these days. That’s why I feel lucky and grateful to be working on a feminist show where we have female showrunners, so many women on the crew and six out of 10 of our directors are women.

That’s something about “GLOW” that I find really amazing and fascinating: We have a cast of 14 women in Season 1, 15 women in Season 2, of all shapes and sizes and ages and socioeconomic backgrounds. They’re interesting, in-depth characters. Their lives revolve around things other than men and being single.

I was talking yesterday with Gillian Jacobs from “Love” about how different it can be shooting a romantic scene when you’re working with a female director. You’re more involved with the way you’re being commodified on the show, which is helpful.

YARA SHAHIDI It’s extremely powerful and inspiring to turn on the TV and see Issa Rae on the show she created, to see Laverne Cox, to see all these women leading shows. Whether it’s cable or [broadcast] television, I feel like we are seeing a difference, and I think it’s partially because the audience is now expecting it. But we’re not nearly there yet.

We are seeing more shows — like Rachel’s “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” — about female awakening.
RACHEL BROSNAHAN At its core, “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” is a story about a woman finding a voice that she didn’t know she had. And that becomes more and more relevant every single day. We’re seeing so many different groups of people in the country finding their voices.

It’s not something that I was necessarily aware of as we were making it, but it’s a huge gift to play this fully realized, completely three-dimensional, complicated, flawed woman.

SHAHIDI We’re definitely seeing more complex roles. It’s less about saying that a character has to be this beautiful, perfect role model who handles it all. If anything, it’s been about making them realer, more complex or more unique. So rather than saying this woman has to be the universal woman, we can deal in specificity. When we add that layer of detail, you can only gain when you’re talking about human complexity.

BRIE What’s great about what’s happening right now is that these stories for women are being told, and I feel like there’s no going back. If I read a script about a woman who can’t get a man, or two women fighting over a guy, I’m just so bored.

EVAN RACHEL WOOD I think everybody’s a little bored by that.

ZAZIE BEETZ For so many years, people were like, “Everybody can identify with a white man lead.” There wasn’t even a thought of, “Oh, someone can identify with a woman as well and not be a woman?” That’s insane.

Many of your shows now feel increasingly timely and resonant precisely because of what’s happening in Hollywood and in society.
WOOD We started “Westworld” before this movement happened, but when people say, “Oh, it’s so timely now, it’s crazy how synced-up it is,” we always say, “No, it’s timeless.” This has always been an issue, but we’re just paying more attention and listening in a different way now. So it seems more relevant.

And it was strange doing Season 2, because it’s all about the uprising and the reckoning, and the women — even though they’re not technically women, they’re machines — coming into their power and realizing who they are.

CLAIRE FOY I think it’s really interesting, the conversations that people are having. A year ago, would TheWrap be having an all-female cover talking about women being empowered? It’s because of a very few brave people got together and put themselves on the line. And then all of a sudden everybody came out of the woodwork and said, “I just realized I can stand up for myself.”

I have learned so much from other women about what they’ve experienced.

GINA RODRIGUEZ I’d love to jump in on that, because I think Time’s Up was created from the response from the American farmworkers — 700 women got together and wrote a letter to the women in Hollywood. This is such a difficult conversation because there’s no way we can encompass everything: This is hours and months and years and history and hundreds of years of domesticated mentalities.

But I believe that the culture for women, if we’re going to specifically speak about that all over the world, is a social norm. We created it and we can change it. But it would take a collective effort to do that.

WOOD We get pitted against each other sometimes, and I think what we’ve realized, which is part of the theme of today, is that we’re stronger together. It’s a slogan, but it’s also very true.

BROSNAHAN One of the coolest things about doing things like this is that we get to spend time together and know each other as peers, and that makes it easier to lift each other up and be each other’s champions and be on the same team. Because previously, there was usually room for one woman in a group of men.

Now, there has been a shift. I’ve been walking into a lot of rooms recently with both men and women where they’re saying, “Do you want to do other things? Do you want to write? Direct? Produce?” I’d never been asked that question before and I hadn’t thought about it much, but now I’m thinking about it and going, “Yeah, I do want to do all those things!”

RODRIGUEZ I produce my own projects because I really got tired of being told, “They don’t think you are this enough.” And I was like, “Who is they?” I need to be they. So I just made sure that I was the they so that I can tell them, “No, I don’t think that’s correct.”

As a young girl, I knew how affected I was by the lack of color on screen. I knew how much I gravitated towards the little bit that we did have that represented our culture. I understand that the lack of history of Latino culture in schools adds to dropout rates. I love that Claire plays one of the most important women in history, but there are so many more that we haven’t seen yet because people don’t even share it in schools. I’m all about doing my own stuff, making my own projects.

Claire, you were the subject of a real furor recently when it was revealed that you made less money than your co-star Matt Smith in the first season of “The Crown,” even though you had a bigger role. It came as a shock…
FOY It’s that unspoken thing. Actors don’t talk with each other about how much they are paid. But we all knew. And now something good has got to come out of all the shame and the embarrassment and the talking about my worth in comparison to one of my best friends.

WOOD I have never been paid the same as my male counterparts. I’m just now to the point where I’m getting paid the same as my male co-stars [on “Westworld”].

BROSNAHAN Really? I’m mad for you but also happy for you now that you’re there.

WOOD I was married to an actor for years and he always got paid more than me, and I actually worked more. And I was like, “I’ll just take what I can get, I’m just happy to be here.”

BROSNAHAN That’s a huge part of the equal-pay conversation, because women are brought up with this idea that there are 100 more of us who could step in at any given moment. So it’s hard to speak up for yourself, because you feel like you could lose it. And honestly in the past, you could.

RODRIGUEZ They do that to us from the start of our careers. Take our power away. I feel like that’s happened to me from the jump. “That’s fine, we have a bunch of people who could step right in.” You diminish someone’s self worth and it’s up to them to believe it or not. I’ve had that from the beginning.

BEETZ It’s about, are you being valued in the same way? Are they seeing you as an asset in the same way that they are seeing your counterpart?

FOY Our industry works on a quote system. You get a quote for one job and it will be used in your next job. It’s across the board, and it’s relatively fair in that sense.

The way it doesn’t work is because if there aren’t leads of people of different races or different genders, then they’re not going to be given the opportunity to ever get their quote up, because they will never be given that lead. And if they do get that lead and they don’t have the same quote as their counterparts because they haven’t had the opportunity before, then I genuinely believe it’s the responsibility of the people who are in charge of making those decisions to pay that person not according to their quote but according to what their part is. That is the only way it will ever make it right.

One of my friends is an Indian actress, and she’s never going to get a high enough quote because when has there been a lead part for an Indian actress? It just has to happen by someone making the decision. It has to be a directive, it has to be something that people just do. Because you want to be paid equally for the work that you do, and for your investment in that which will make a lot of other people very wealthy.

So it’s time to be outspoken and stand up for yourself.
FOY It’s not even about being outspoken. It’s just about saying, “These are the facts!”

RODRIGUEZ That’s what it is. It’s like, a woman does it and she’s being craaaaazy. A man does it, it’s logic. We gotta stop talking about it that way. It’s not about being outspoken, it’s about laying the truth down.

WOOD I’ve been working for 25 years, and the people with money are still men. You’re pitching projects about women to a room full of older white men with money who aren’t necessarily creative types. Those rooms need to change. They need to be more diverse and have more women, more people of color, more everything.

BROSNAHAN It’s hard when there’s one group at the top making all the decisions and controlling all the money. People in positions of power need to look like what the world looks like, so that the art we’re making reflects the world we live in and the world we aspire to live in.
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Posted by Girl Jay on March 27, 2018

Ahead of delivering the keynote speech for Create & Cultivate’s Austin conference, the Golden Globe winner talked family, Time’s Up and her “Movement Mondays” series.

Though there were many films premiering at SXSW, Gina Rodriguez was not in town for any of them.

The day after speaking on a panel for Bumble, the Golden Globe winner was the keynote speaker at the Austin conference for Fossil and Create & Cultivate, the online platform and conference series for women “who want to create and cultivate the career of their dreams,” as the company says.

Given her noted passion for female empowerment and advocacy for representation of women and minorities in the film industry, Rodriguez seemed a no-brainer choice.

“Both of the panels I chose to do at SXSW are female empowering, female-led, female entrepreneurs, and that what I’m about,” Rodriguez says, ahead of her address. “I love the idea of dialogue, period. It’s where I’ve always gotten my inspiration from: hearing other women speak, their journeys and their paths.”

Growing up, she didn’t have to look further than her own household to find women who inspired her.

“I was raised by incredible women. My two older sisters, my mother, my grandmother: I was in a house filled with women. My father was the odd man out. And he definitely always empowered us and was an ally of female empowerment and feminism — and back then those weren’t the terms that they used,” she says. “But those women. Those are definitely the women who stand out the most, when I think about the way in which I want to live my life, the way in which I made steps and decisions in my life.”

Rodriguez has long used Instagram as a platform for spreading positivity; she does a weekly series called “Movement Mondays” where she profiles an inspirational figure for her followers.

“I’ve been trying to expose under representation with minority groups. So it’s nice to start fueling the energy into new environments that want to do the same,” she says. “I think that what’s great about what’s happening in our climate right now is that everybody is participating and it just allows you to not only be uplifted by everybody’s excitement and their desire for change for gender role change, for these conversations to be happening, for you to do the same. With Time’s Up, I finally had a space where you can feel all the energy, all the excitement, all that energy for change. It’s really lovely to see that crab in a barrel social norm go away: everybody clawing at each other to get to the top, because for so long there was only one seat at the table for a woman.”

“The beautiful opening of education and knowledge showed us that there is more than one seat, and we are stronger when we work together,” she continued. “And that the reason that the boys’ club happened was because they had one. So we need a f–king girls’ club, and a girl gang. It’s just lovely to see everybody rise up and utilize their power for positivity. Because it doesn’t hurt anybody; on the contrary, it just helps everyone.”
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