Gina Rodriguez Fan

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elcome to Gina Rodriguez Fan, your online resource dedicated to American actress Gina Rodriguez. You may know Gina from her roles in "Jane the Virgin", "Annihilation", "Deepwater Horizon", "Filly Brown" and many more television and film roles. This fansite is home to the most comprehensive photo gallery on Gina Rodriguez with over 73,000 photos. It is our aim to be a hub online for Gina fans to visit for the latest news, photos, and information in supporting Gina's career, while still respecting her privacy. We hope you enjoy your stay and don't forget to bookmark us and follow us on twitter to see news and photos on your twitter feed. - J.
Posted by Girl Jay on October 16, 2018

Gina Rodriguez is no stranger to a fight. Inside the boxing ring, she’s trained in muay Thai. Outside the boxing ring, she’s a Latina in Hollywood who’s been fighting for inclusivity for as long as she can remember. And with her next film, Miss Bala, she’ll combine both of those skills to become an action star.

“I had been dying to do action for so long, and it’s very difficult because people of color don’t have as many opportunities,” the actress tells EW. “And that’s not even like a ‘Woe is me.’ That’s just a reality, and that’s okay. That has been a reality of mine for many, many, many years. [With Miss Bala], Sony made a big-budget action film with a 95 percent Latinx cast and 95 percent Latinx production crew. It’s revolutionary. It’s just really great to live in these spaces that for so long I didn’t have the opportunity to.”

The Jane the Virgin star plays Gloria in Miss Bala — for which EW has the exclusive trailer and first-look photos — a remake of the 2011 film, in which Rodriguez’s character travels to Tijuana after the death of her parents. There, she’s forced to work for a crime boss after witnessing a murder. And to make matters worse, the crime boss also kidnaps Gloria’s best friend. So not only does Gloria have to figure out how to save herself, but she also has to figure out how to save the one person she considers her family.

“It’s a reconceptualizing of the original film, and it’s more modern,” Rodriguez says. “[Gloria is] someone that’s actively trying to save herself and her family. I think that’s really amazing because a lot of the women in my life, they actively work toward keeping their families safe, and they actively try to fix situations. There’s no woman I know in my life that just sits back. Women aren’t necessarily always portrayed as proactively trying to save ourselves in action films. It’s very empowering to see those stories because I know that’s what the women in my life do.”

The remake is directed by Catherine Hardwicke and follows Gloria as she fights to free herself (and her best friend) from an extremely dangerous situation. The result is what Rodriguez calls a “classic action roller coaster,” but despite the title translating to “Miss Bullet,” Gloria uses more than just guns to get herself out of the aforementioned situation.

“It’s a very realistic protecting of herself,” Rodriguez says of Gloria. “She uses her smarts, she uses her savvy. She uses many tools, and I feel like that is so what women do. We have so many different tools. We use it all — the illogical and the logical, the emotional and the rational. And it’s really incredible that we are capable of that.”

Rodriguez knows what it’s like to use many different tools to win a fight, and as far as her career is concerned, Miss Bala represents more than just her chance to be an action hero. “The opportunity to make this with my fellow Latinos and Latinas was next-level,” she says. “I’m like, ‘They’re going to let us do this?! They’re going to let us be in front of and behind the camera and they’re going to give us money to make this?!’ This is inclusivity. This is what I’m talking about.”

Watch the full trailer for Miss Bala, which hits theaters Feb. 1, and check out the film’s poster.
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Posted by Girl Jay on September 28, 2018

Gina was on The Late Late Show with James Corden promoting Smallfoot. I’ve added photos to the gallery and you can view clips below. She’s just too adorable!

Posted by Girl Jay on September 26, 2018

Gina was on The Talk promoting Smallfoot. I’ve added photos to the gallery and you can view a clip below. She really just seems like the loveliest person.

Posted by Girl Jay on May 29, 2018

Evan Rachel Wood, Gina Rodriguez and Other Stars Take Aim at TV’s Patriarchy: ‘There’s No Going Back’
TheWrap Emmy magazine: Zazie Beetz, Alison Brie, Rachel Brosnahan, Claire Foy, Gina Rodriguez, Yara Shahidi and Evan Rachel Wood talk about “laying the truth down”

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This story first appeared as the cover story in the Race Begins issue of TheWrap’s Emmy magazine.

It’s a different day for Hollywood, and for our culture. From the time allegations of sexual misbehavior rained down on mogul Harvey Weinstein last October, this business and many others have been rocked by revelations and allegations, and by a sense that the time is long overdue to afford women equal respect and equal opportunities rather than treating them like commodities.

In this climate — with hashtags like #MeToo and organizations like Time’s Up working to affect real change — TheWrap convened seven television actresses to discuss what they’ve experienced in their careers, what they’ve seen in the last nine months and where they’d like things to go from here.

TheWrap’s Sharon Waxman and Beatrice Verhoeven asked the questions; Zazie Beetz from “Atlanta,” Alison Brie from “GLOW,” Rachel Brosnahan from “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel,” Claire Foy from “The Crown,” Gina Rodriguez from “Jane the Virgin,” Yara Shahidi from “black-ish” and “grown-ish” and Evan Rachel Wood from “Westworld” answered them.

What does it feel like for all of you at this particular moment in time, with everything that has happened over the last eight or nine months? Are you mindful of the politics going on around you in Hollywood and in the wider world?
ALISON BRIE Well, there’s no way to ignore what’s going on in our industry these days. That’s why I feel lucky and grateful to be working on a feminist show where we have female showrunners, so many women on the crew and six out of 10 of our directors are women.

That’s something about “GLOW” that I find really amazing and fascinating: We have a cast of 14 women in Season 1, 15 women in Season 2, of all shapes and sizes and ages and socioeconomic backgrounds. They’re interesting, in-depth characters. Their lives revolve around things other than men and being single.

I was talking yesterday with Gillian Jacobs from “Love” about how different it can be shooting a romantic scene when you’re working with a female director. You’re more involved with the way you’re being commodified on the show, which is helpful.

YARA SHAHIDI It’s extremely powerful and inspiring to turn on the TV and see Issa Rae on the show she created, to see Laverne Cox, to see all these women leading shows. Whether it’s cable or [broadcast] television, I feel like we are seeing a difference, and I think it’s partially because the audience is now expecting it. But we’re not nearly there yet.

We are seeing more shows — like Rachel’s “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” — about female awakening.
RACHEL BROSNAHAN At its core, “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” is a story about a woman finding a voice that she didn’t know she had. And that becomes more and more relevant every single day. We’re seeing so many different groups of people in the country finding their voices.

It’s not something that I was necessarily aware of as we were making it, but it’s a huge gift to play this fully realized, completely three-dimensional, complicated, flawed woman.

SHAHIDI We’re definitely seeing more complex roles. It’s less about saying that a character has to be this beautiful, perfect role model who handles it all. If anything, it’s been about making them realer, more complex or more unique. So rather than saying this woman has to be the universal woman, we can deal in specificity. When we add that layer of detail, you can only gain when you’re talking about human complexity.

BRIE What’s great about what’s happening right now is that these stories for women are being told, and I feel like there’s no going back. If I read a script about a woman who can’t get a man, or two women fighting over a guy, I’m just so bored.

EVAN RACHEL WOOD I think everybody’s a little bored by that.

ZAZIE BEETZ For so many years, people were like, “Everybody can identify with a white man lead.” There wasn’t even a thought of, “Oh, someone can identify with a woman as well and not be a woman?” That’s insane.

Many of your shows now feel increasingly timely and resonant precisely because of what’s happening in Hollywood and in society.
WOOD We started “Westworld” before this movement happened, but when people say, “Oh, it’s so timely now, it’s crazy how synced-up it is,” we always say, “No, it’s timeless.” This has always been an issue, but we’re just paying more attention and listening in a different way now. So it seems more relevant.

And it was strange doing Season 2, because it’s all about the uprising and the reckoning, and the women — even though they’re not technically women, they’re machines — coming into their power and realizing who they are.

CLAIRE FOY I think it’s really interesting, the conversations that people are having. A year ago, would TheWrap be having an all-female cover talking about women being empowered? It’s because of a very few brave people got together and put themselves on the line. And then all of a sudden everybody came out of the woodwork and said, “I just realized I can stand up for myself.”

I have learned so much from other women about what they’ve experienced.

GINA RODRIGUEZ I’d love to jump in on that, because I think Time’s Up was created from the response from the American farmworkers — 700 women got together and wrote a letter to the women in Hollywood. This is such a difficult conversation because there’s no way we can encompass everything: This is hours and months and years and history and hundreds of years of domesticated mentalities.

But I believe that the culture for women, if we’re going to specifically speak about that all over the world, is a social norm. We created it and we can change it. But it would take a collective effort to do that.

WOOD We get pitted against each other sometimes, and I think what we’ve realized, which is part of the theme of today, is that we’re stronger together. It’s a slogan, but it’s also very true.

BROSNAHAN One of the coolest things about doing things like this is that we get to spend time together and know each other as peers, and that makes it easier to lift each other up and be each other’s champions and be on the same team. Because previously, there was usually room for one woman in a group of men.

Now, there has been a shift. I’ve been walking into a lot of rooms recently with both men and women where they’re saying, “Do you want to do other things? Do you want to write? Direct? Produce?” I’d never been asked that question before and I hadn’t thought about it much, but now I’m thinking about it and going, “Yeah, I do want to do all those things!”

RODRIGUEZ I produce my own projects because I really got tired of being told, “They don’t think you are this enough.” And I was like, “Who is they?” I need to be they. So I just made sure that I was the they so that I can tell them, “No, I don’t think that’s correct.”

As a young girl, I knew how affected I was by the lack of color on screen. I knew how much I gravitated towards the little bit that we did have that represented our culture. I understand that the lack of history of Latino culture in schools adds to dropout rates. I love that Claire plays one of the most important women in history, but there are so many more that we haven’t seen yet because people don’t even share it in schools. I’m all about doing my own stuff, making my own projects.

Claire, you were the subject of a real furor recently when it was revealed that you made less money than your co-star Matt Smith in the first season of “The Crown,” even though you had a bigger role. It came as a shock…
FOY It’s that unspoken thing. Actors don’t talk with each other about how much they are paid. But we all knew. And now something good has got to come out of all the shame and the embarrassment and the talking about my worth in comparison to one of my best friends.

WOOD I have never been paid the same as my male counterparts. I’m just now to the point where I’m getting paid the same as my male co-stars [on “Westworld”].

BROSNAHAN Really? I’m mad for you but also happy for you now that you’re there.

WOOD I was married to an actor for years and he always got paid more than me, and I actually worked more. And I was like, “I’ll just take what I can get, I’m just happy to be here.”

BROSNAHAN That’s a huge part of the equal-pay conversation, because women are brought up with this idea that there are 100 more of us who could step in at any given moment. So it’s hard to speak up for yourself, because you feel like you could lose it. And honestly in the past, you could.

RODRIGUEZ They do that to us from the start of our careers. Take our power away. I feel like that’s happened to me from the jump. “That’s fine, we have a bunch of people who could step right in.” You diminish someone’s self worth and it’s up to them to believe it or not. I’ve had that from the beginning.

BEETZ It’s about, are you being valued in the same way? Are they seeing you as an asset in the same way that they are seeing your counterpart?

FOY Our industry works on a quote system. You get a quote for one job and it will be used in your next job. It’s across the board, and it’s relatively fair in that sense.

The way it doesn’t work is because if there aren’t leads of people of different races or different genders, then they’re not going to be given the opportunity to ever get their quote up, because they will never be given that lead. And if they do get that lead and they don’t have the same quote as their counterparts because they haven’t had the opportunity before, then I genuinely believe it’s the responsibility of the people who are in charge of making those decisions to pay that person not according to their quote but according to what their part is. That is the only way it will ever make it right.

One of my friends is an Indian actress, and she’s never going to get a high enough quote because when has there been a lead part for an Indian actress? It just has to happen by someone making the decision. It has to be a directive, it has to be something that people just do. Because you want to be paid equally for the work that you do, and for your investment in that which will make a lot of other people very wealthy.

So it’s time to be outspoken and stand up for yourself.
FOY It’s not even about being outspoken. It’s just about saying, “These are the facts!”

RODRIGUEZ That’s what it is. It’s like, a woman does it and she’s being craaaaazy. A man does it, it’s logic. We gotta stop talking about it that way. It’s not about being outspoken, it’s about laying the truth down.

WOOD I’ve been working for 25 years, and the people with money are still men. You’re pitching projects about women to a room full of older white men with money who aren’t necessarily creative types. Those rooms need to change. They need to be more diverse and have more women, more people of color, more everything.

BROSNAHAN It’s hard when there’s one group at the top making all the decisions and controlling all the money. People in positions of power need to look like what the world looks like, so that the art we’re making reflects the world we live in and the world we aspire to live in.
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Posted by Girl Jay on May 17, 2018

Has Detective Rosa Diaz finally met her match?

TVLine has your exclusive sneak peek at Sunday’s Brooklyn Nine-Nine season finale (Fox, 8:30/7:30c), which introduces Jane the Virgin‘s Gina Rodriguez as a potential love interest for Rosa.

As previewed by series co-creator Dan Goor, Rodriguez plays Alicia, an Uber driver who comes into Rosa’s life when she least expects it. “They meet by chance… and Rosa is not looking for love,” he says. “But the question is, once she meets Gina Rodriguez’s character, will she be able to avoid it?” (Judging by Rosa’s googly-eyed expression, we’re guessing the answer is no.)

As previously reported, Brooklyn Nine-Nine‘s Season 5 finale marks the Andy Samberg sitcom’s last episode on Fox, before moving to NBC for a 13-episode Season 6. The very special outing, titled “Jake and Amy,” will feature the highly antipicated Peraltiago wedding.
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Posted by Girl Jay on February 21, 2018

The actress is taking on Hollywood, taking over her health, and taking it one day at a time.

When I spoke to Gina Rodriguez on a recent Wednesday night, I was still pumped from attending a press screening of her latest movie, Annihilation, earlier that day (a fact that Rodriguez met with delighted laughter, admitting that even she hadn’t seen it yet). I have very high standards for sci-fi and horror films—I expect to startle and gasp and cover my eyes—and this movie didn’t just clear my very high bar; it vaulted over it. But to be honest, even if it had failed to register on my scare-o-meter, I would have loved it for what it is at its heart: in Rodriguez’s words, “a human story and…bad bitches going into action.”

In the film, which lands in theaters nationwide on Friday, February 23, Rodriguez plays Anya Thorensen, a paramedic who has volunteered to explore The Shimmer, a mystifying, dangerous, ever-expanding territory. Those who go into The Shimmer often don’t return.

Venturing into the force field alongside Anya are women toting guns, ammo, and advanced degrees in STEM: biologist Lena (Natalie Portman), physicist Josie (Tessa Thompson), geologist Cass (Tuva Novotny), and psychologist Dr. Ventress (Jennifer Jason Leigh). Together, they’re determined to do what practically no one else has: enter The Shimmer, discover what it is, and return unscathed.

The role fit Rodriguez like Anya’s well-worn fatigues. “The classic roles that are afforded to me—here, Gina, this is what you’re capable of doing—are usually roles I don’t even relate to,” she says, explaining that she identifies more with layered parts like the main character in Lady Bird than with parts inscribed by one-dimensional Latina stereotypes. Playing Anya? “It felt like butter.”

When I spoke to Gina Rodriguez on a recent Wednesday night, I was still pumped from attending a press screening of her latest movie, Annihilation, earlier that day (a fact that Rodriguez met with delighted laughter, admitting that even she hadn’t seen it yet). I have very high standards for sci-fi and horror films—I expect to startle and gasp and cover my eyes—and this movie didn’t just clear my very high bar; it vaulted over it. But to be honest, even if it had failed to register on my scare-o-meter, I would have loved it for what it is at its heart: in Rodriguez’s words, “a human story and…bad bitches going into action.”

In the film, which lands in theaters nationwide on Friday, February 23, Rodriguez plays Anya Thorensen, a paramedic who has volunteered to explore The Shimmer, a mystifying, dangerous, ever-expanding territory. Those who go into The Shimmer often don’t return.

Venturing into the force field alongside Anya are women toting guns, ammo, and advanced degrees in STEM: biologist Lena (Natalie Portman), physicist Josie (Tessa Thompson), geologist Cass (Tuva Novotny), and psychologist Dr. Ventress (Jennifer Jason Leigh). Together, they’re determined to do what practically no one else has: enter The Shimmer, discover what it is, and return unscathed.

The role fit Rodriguez like Anya’s well-worn fatigues. “The classic roles that are afforded to me—here, Gina, this is what you’re capable of doing—are usually roles I don’t even relate to,” she says, explaining that she identifies more with layered parts like the main character in Lady Bird than with parts inscribed by one-dimensional Latina stereotypes. Playing Anya? “It felt like butter.”

At first, Rodriguez says, Hashimoto’s felt like “the curse of a lifetime,” especially in an industry that places so much emphasis on size. The disease, though treatable, has no cure. For years after being diagnosed with hypothyroidism at 19 and Hashimoto’s at 26, and putting on weight that wouldn’t budge, Rodriguez preferred to deny what she was going through rather than focus her efforts on doing whatever she could to feel better. “To the core of my being, I know what it’s like to feel like there is no way I can win this, so where do I even begin,” she reflects.

She tried to rebel against what she knew her body needed by not taking her medicine on time, eating foods that she knew would make her feel terrible (looking at you, dairy), or deciding working out wasn’t worth it if it wouldn’t change her body. Eventually, she realized something had to give: “[Hashimoto’s] affects so many aspects of your life. I’ve had it for so many years…that rebellion of not taking care of myself can’t exist anymore.”

Over the years, she started taking her treatments seriously, changing her diet, and working out for health instead of weight loss. Though weight comes off naturally as a result of all her efforts combined, it’s also complicated by what roles she’s working on at a given time. To prepare for her intensely physical role in Annihilation, she weight trained and went vegan, so naturally, her body changed. When she spends 16-hour days on-set playing the titular character in the CW series Jane the Virgin—a role for which she’s determined not to lose weight—she’s at what she calls her “comfortable” weight, which she can maintain without an intense workout regimen and diet changes.

“I’m OK in both of those,” she says. “I’m not less than because I’m 10, 15, 20 pounds more.” On the flip side, she knows it’s not inherently better—that she’s not inherently better—when she happens to weigh less, and that her handling of weight doesn’t say anything about her other than that she’s human.

Five months ago, Rodriguez started working with “a great new nutritionist,” who identified a bunch of common foods that were getting in the way of her health. When she stays away from them, she says, “so many of my ailments are gone. It feels like freedom. This is new. I’m 33. It’s taken me a while.”

She qualifies: “I can’t say I’m on point, always on it, because, man, I’m flawed.” A raft of most-craved foods rolls off her tongue with ease. “I want the burger and the ice cream and the red velvet cupcakes. I want the croissant with my coffee, even though gluten doesn’t do me justice.” But it helps to remember it’s all about baby steps, about making healthy living a daily, or even hourly, decision. “When you say, just today, I’m going to choose this because I know it’s going to make me feel better, that’s not such a crazy Mount Everest.”

Her boyfriend of one and a half years, Joe LoCicero, has been a cornerstone of the network of friends and family supporting her as she navigates the choppy waters of chronic illness. An actor and martial artist who practices Muay Thai (Thai boxing), LoCicero traveled to Thailand with Rodriguez in late 2016 so they could train in the sport together.

“[He] has really helped me have a healthier perspective on [weight], that stupid number that can destroy us and feel like it’s equivalent to our self-worth,” she says. “This love is so easy,” she adds, describing her relationship with LoCicero as one of “respect and kindness, and generosity, and compromise, and sacrifice.”

It bothers her that another symptom of Hashimoto’s—memory troubles—can make it seem like she doesn’t always appreciate the little details that make their relationship so great. While she says that her forgetfulness hasn’t interfered with memorizing lines, an important part of her job, “I can’t remember maybe a sweet thing my boyfriend has said to me a week ago. Or what we ate yesterday,” she laments. “It makes me feel shame. I don’t want him to think that I’m not remembering our special moments together. And that stinks.”

Rodriguez rose to fame in 2014 on Jane the Virgin (where she and LoCicero met). The show introduced enthusiastic swaths of America to the delicious drama of Latin American soap operas known as telenovelas. It has everything: murder, romance, and Jane’s accidental artificial insemination as a virgin, to boot. After its first season, the series won a People’s Choice Award and a Peabody, and Rodriguez took home a Golden Globe for best actress in a TV comedy or musical.

“Jane is just the greatest thing that ever happened to me,” Rodriguez says. But she is quick to point out that she works her ass off to help it—and herself—succeed.

“I didn’t know my worth [at the start of my career] because the industry had such a specific perspective on what it should be as a brown woman,” Rodriguez says. “I had to start saying, ‘Well, I know if I work hard, I can show my worth,’ and I have been doing nothing but that.”

Rodriguez, who studied film at NYU, recently directed her first episode of the show, now in its fourth season. She also started a production company, I Can And I Will Productions, through which she is developing multiple projects with CBS Studios that portray the Latino experience. Stepping behind the camera, she realized it wasn’t some immutable force deciding what she was capable of and what she deserved. It was just other people. That knowledge primed her to advocate for herself. “Especially women, and especially women of color, really have to fight for equal pay,” she says. “My white sisters definitely have a higher starting point, my black sisters as well. Latinos really do live in the lower end of pay.”

A vocal advocate of the Me Too and Time’s Up movements, Rodriguez is harnessing her power to help fight for women not just in her industry, but in all of them. “It’s empowering and encouraging and viscerally stimulating to be a part and lend the little voice I have to this giant cause of beautiful change towards a more fair world, a more fair environment,” Rodriguez says. “It doesn’t take away from anyone or anything. It just makes everything easier and clearer and kinder and makes room for more possibility.”

When I ask about her biggest professional goals, she doesn’t hesitate. “I’m ready to do my movie,” she says, meaning that she wants to direct a feature she’s “been mulling over for a while.” “Whether that means success or failure, I’m ready to go for it.” Other items on the list: producing more, along with creating more positions—both in front of and behind the camera—for women and Latino people, a cause she takes particularly seriously amidst today’s political tensions.

“Obviously I come from a very specific lens and a very specific perspective,” she says. “I of course would love to see Latino communities uplifted and celebrated in a positive light, because our administration loves to show us in such a negative light. That’s going to be a part of my fight.”

Whatever she’s fighting for (or against)—whether it’s better representation in media, chronic illness, fair treatment for women in low-wage service jobs, or a terrifying evil force swallowing people and cities and mutating the world as we know it—Rodriguez is learning that you’ve gotta look out for number one, too.

“I’ve just recently started getting really debilitating panic attacks and anxiety,” she tells me. At various times, she’s pinned them on first-time-director nerves and the pressure to strike the right tone in her show, on stress and life changes, on “balancing reality with fiction, and reality with the bullshit of social media, the kind of psychological change that’s happening in our climate, period.” But she also realized she was taking too much thyroid medication, which was causing heart palpitations that spiraled into anxiety attacks. She lowered her dosage, and the attacks went away.

“It is really important for us to be super self-aware,” she says. “I wasn’t banking on that. I wasn’t like, hey, yeah, let me get a disease that makes me have to be super aware. I don’t want to be super aware of myself all of the time.”

After our call, I think about how Rodriguez describes Anya: “She was that person, the one that pays the bills and gets shit done and fixes the car and fixes the leak.” I think about bad bitches going into action, both on and off the screen. But most of all, I think about Rodriguez’s reminder that every woman determined to make things happen—herself and Anya included—is really just a human, after all.
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